DreamCloud Psychiatry Takes Telemedicine to New Heights

man-in-red-tank-top-and-black-shorts-sitting-on-running-3763876New York, NY — Telemedicine has changed the way patients receive medical care and its use has surged among patients across every demographic during COVID-19. There are an estimated 7 million global users of telemedicine, which is expected to become a $64.1 billion industry by 2025. But when every medical provider is doing it, how does one stay ahead?

Chris Lee, 37, CEO and founder of DreamCloud Psychiatry, believes “the most important goal in telemedicine is to achieve the highest quality care. It’s easy to become distracted by the technology but in the end it’s about delivering great patient care. When patients have a positive experience, they’re more likely to participate in their care and we can achieve higher outcomes.”

Lee and his team have developed a custom HIPAA-compliant mobile app, which combines telemedicine “cloud visits” with live chat, phone calls, text and voice messaging. They also use social media to expand communication platforms beyond video visits. “By increasing patient engagement, we’re able to create a patient experience which is not only more effective, but feels a lot more real.”

DreamCloud Psychiatry, simply known as DreamCloud, is focused on millennial mental health patients and helping them to achieve their dreams. From their offices in Miami Beach and New York City, the award-winning company treats patients online through a monthly membership format, which includes unlimited visits. Patients can book appointments online or using their mobile app.

An NYU-grad, Lee says COVID-19’s impact on New York had a strong emotional connection for him. “This generation has been through everything from 9/11 to Parkland, social media to telemedicine, political protests—and pandemics. This is the most urgent time in the history of mental health.”

DreamCloud has partnered up with local businesses in New York City including Capsule Pharmacy, to provide accessible services and medication home delivery so patients can safely obtain their medications from home. “Working together to help others is paramount at this time,” says Carlos Rodriguez, Patient Care Director at DreamCloud. “We believe patients deserve the best care.”

How To Win Millennials In Telemedicine

REPOSTED FROM THE DAILY TELESCOPE: https://www.dailytelescope.com/how-to-win-millennials-in-telemedicine/192223

 

NEW YORK, NY – 10-03-2018  — A startup telemedicine practice called DreamCloud Psychiatry, based in Miami Beach, Florida, is looking to change the way mental health providers deliver virtual medical services. Chris Lee, 35, a millennial entrepreneur and the company’s founder, wanted to create a solution to what he calls “one of telemedicine’s greatest challenges,” which is “keeping it real.”

“The most important part of a patient-provider relationship in telemedicine is maintaining a connection that feels real,” says Lee. “If the patient feels disconnected in any way from their provider, they will most likely look for another one.”

Lee, an NYU-graduate and psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner, created DreamCloud Psychiatry with a specific target market in mind — millennials. “Younger patients are obsessed with mental health. They are advocates for topics and current issues that are important to them. They care not only about perceptions, but also things like politics, entertainment, and social media, from a mental health standpoint. We put those things at the forefront.”

His practice, which opened in 2017, has “redesigned psychiatric mental healthcare,” according to its website. By using contemporary references to millennial culture, including Instagram-style visuals and language which speaks to a younger patient demographic, Lee has built a small private practice with roughly 300 patients in less than a year. He hired a registered dietician and a celebrity fitness trainer to help him build a mental health practice that would attract the next generation of patients. The company treats patients in Florida and New York.

DreamCloud Psychiatry is not the only brand moving swiftly in telemedicine. According to the American Telemedicine Associationover half of all US hospitals are using telemedicine to offer affordable, accessible healthcare to Americans. But Lee says that it’s only halfway of a solution.

“We can’t keep creating telemedicine practices that feel like big-box corporate companies. Millennials like small brands. They gravitate toward things that have an identity which they can relate to,” says Lee. “Our patients connect with us through social media, they subscribe to our mailing lists, engage with blogs, and they feel most comfortable when they feel like they can communicate with us like they do with their peers. We do a lot of emailing and texting. We keep things current and efficient, but also strive to create a culture.”

Victoria Huff, of The Thirty, identifies millennials as “a generation that has come to be defined by its relationship with mental health.” And she’s right. With over 88% of 18-29 year olds using social media platforms, the American Psychiatric Association conducted a survey earlier this year and found that millennials are by far the most anxious generation yet. According to the US Census in 2015, there are over 75.4 million millennials in the US.

A generation that has been shaped by impactful social issues including gun violence, suicide, terrorism, GLBT rights, and bullying — millennials helped make “13 Reasons Why,” a teen-suicide drama, the most popular show in America on a seven-day average per-capita basis in 2018. It’s no surprise that millennials form the fastest-growing patient demographic in mental healthcare.

Meanwhile, U.S. healthcare providers struggle to meet the demand. Looking for a great psychiatrist is becoming increasingly difficult as the number of psychiatrists practicing in the US continues to dwindle. Forbes Magazine reported in March 2018 that of the 18,000 psychiatrists currently practicing in the US, 3/5 of them are over the age of 55 and likely to retire soon in the years to come.

There is no doubt that telemedicine will continue to increase in popularity and that many gaps in healthcare delivery have the potential to be filled via virtual medicine. With so many new and innovative telemedicine companies forming on a daily basis, which ones will millennials trust? According to Lee, “Ask younger patients what they value and give them credit for what means so much to them. That’s keeping it real.”

How Do You Know If A Dog Is An Emotional Support Animal Or A Service Animal? What are my rights?

A lot of people want to know the difference between a service animal and an emotional support animal (ESA). Many airplanes, hotels, train stations, and apartments require special documentation indicating that your pet meets the criteria of either one or the other, so that you can travel with them, live with them, and claim them as a necessity part of your mental or physical health.

But what is the difference? Here are the facts:

An emotional service animal (ESA) is a pet that a mental health professional has said provides a distinct service for a person to help them maintain stability and functionality in their day-to-day life.

ESA’s can be prescribed by many different professional including psychotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, counselors, some nurses and social workers.

A service animal sounds the same but is very different. When a pet is a service animal, this usually means that the person has a medical or psychiatric disability. This is the determination that can only be made by a medical provider.

Not all mental health professionals are considered medical providers. A medical provider is somebody like a physician, nurse practitioner, psychiatrist, or psychiatric nurse practitioner.

And they’re actually is quite an important difference — citing a medical or psychiatric disability gives you the opportunity to enroll in disability benefits, withdraw from school or work, receive governmental assistance, and obtain special accommodation in many other areas. Status of disability is a legal state – and subject to all kinds of charges and fines if deemed fraudulent.

If I document requires that you have a service animal for a disability, be careful. Sometimes a letter for an ESA will not suffice. If you have an ESA, be careful not to say that you have a disability, if you don’t.

One very important tip to remember is that your mental health information is private and confidential.

Nobody, not including a government agency, such as TSA or airport security, has a right to ask you what your disability is. They also are not qualified to tell you if your disability is a disability or not.

The only question that they may ask is what the dog does for you and if it is an ESA or service animal per a licensed provider’s written documentation. Recently, airlines have also required passengers to sign a form saying that they will take care of any mess caused by the pet.

Guess what else? The animal does not have to be trained in any special service to be an ESA or support animal. Currently in the US, there are no regulatory boards that certifies animals as ESA or service dogs.

Those vests? Not legally required. Certificate of training? Not legally required. Companies all over Google are making hundreds of dollars ripping off naive patients, selling these things and pretending that you need ID cards. Also, not legally required.

As a licensed psychiatric nurse practitioner and dog lover, I think that every pet, which part of our lives, which we have adopted, which we have raised, and who waits for us at the end of our long work day — provides emotional support. It would be impossible for me to say that a support animal is merely a decorative pet and does not provide emotional support.

In conclusion, be confident when you’re seeking accommodation for your emotional support animal, know your rights, know that you do not have to answer personal, private questions pertaining to your disability or your medical history.

If you have a medical or psychiatric disability, know that there are even more regulations and laws that protect you and your health privacy.

We are we are all creatures of the world here to take care of other, and we forget sometimes how much our pets take care of us.

Keep fighting stigma, my friends. Join my fight.

Go here to find a pet that is looking for an amazing person like you.

Go here to learn about my awesome practice in Miami Beach.

Chris Lee, PMHNP-BC

Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

Email Me

DreamCloud Psychiatry

5 Signs of Friday FOMO

1. You want to stay at work late.

Being the last one to leave on Friday could sound like it’s a good thing — you might tell people you’re preparing ahead for Monday or that you’re waiting for traffic to die down.

GO HOME! You worked hard and avoiding Friday FOMO by working even more is only going to make you feel worse. It’s self-sabotaging. Every extra hour you spend at work is one less hour of enjoying your weekend.

2. You think maybe you have no “real” friends.

Who are you kidding? Your coworkers are NOT your friends! After you spend 40-60 hours with the same people, it’s normal to feel a little separation anxiety. With so many tasks at work, and people to deal with – suddenly you see a break and it might feel like, “now what?”

It’s important to remember that time with friends is going to feel different. The pace might be faster or slower. There might be plans on the calendar or there not be. Don’t let your work ethic fool you into thinking that your social life isn’t great because the phone’s not ringing.

3. Everybody on social media looks so busy.

They’re totally not — They’re just as lonely and tired as you are. But after a long work week, maybe they happened to have a concert ticket, or a birthday dinner! And they’re going to want to everybody to know with hundred of selfies.

Nobody wants to be defined by their workplace behavior. So they overcompensate.

4. You tell people you’re sleepy and that you’re going to bed.

If you can go to work every morning, tired AF, force yourself to put your game-face on after 4 hours of sleep — you can put the same effort toward making quality time with yourself, your family, or your friends.

SO treat yourself! Take a friend to dinner. Invite a friend over to Netflix/Chill. Take a bubble bath and sing Mariah Carey songs.

DISCONNECT from the week. You’ll be so much happier on Monday.

5. You feel like everybody forgot about you.

Well, in a way, they did during the week. But you forgot about them too! You had deadlines, meetings, presentations, you were NOT thinking about them all week.

So don’t get upset that nobody’s texted you yet! Take out your phone and text them. Let people know you remembered them, and that like to spend time with them.

Your never feel Friday FOMO ever again.

Chris Lee PMHMP-BC is a psychiatric nurse practitioner and the founder of DreamCloud Psychiatry in Miami Beach, Florida.

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Why Being Depressed Is Different Than Having Depression

‘French horn’ and ‘shoe horn’ sound alike but they’re nothing the same at all.

Ever wonder why things like depression, anxiety, bipolar, panic — are common emotions for some people, and debilitating disorders for others?

You’re not alone. It’s not always easy to explain to patients the difference between the “street” definition vs. the “medical” definition of ambiguous names given to mental health disorders.

If whoever named them could have been a bit more creative, there’d be less confusion — and perhaps less stigma.

For many people, “depressed” simply means feeling sad. “Anxiety” means feeling worried or nervous. And being “bipolar” means flip-flopping between happy and sad, or calm and upset, with no control over it.

The problem is — they’re right! All those terms have meaning in the real world, and we know what somebody means to say when they use them.

But, they’re also very wrong. While the names of mental health disorders contain common words, terms like “depression” mean something very different to a mental health provider.

In the DSM-5, “depressed mood” does appear as one of criteria for major depressive disorder. But it’s only one of eight other symptoms required to have the diagnosis.

Simply having a sad mood doesn’t make the cut. Mental health professionals are looking at sleep patterns, weight fluctuations, changes in interests, lethargy and fatigue — generally not the kinds of questions you would ask a friend if they told you they felt depressed.

When evaluating panic, mental health professionals might ask you about changes in your heart rate or breathing, any medical conditions or medication history, and how comfortable you feel leaving the house. They might ask if you’ve had one last month, and how many times it has happened.

Bipolar is one of the most commonly mistaken words. With bipolar, if you say your mood goes up and down every day — mental health professionals cross “bipolar” off the list. Because that’s not bipolar disorder. They will want to know how much you slept this week, if you’ve ever been hospitalized, what type of jobs you’ve held and impulsive things you’ve done, and the last time you ate.

You might be thinking – wtf?

One issue that fuels mental health stigma is the false notion that since everybody feels depressed or anxious sometimes, anybody that claims to have depression or an anxiety disorder – is just experiencing an exaggerated form of the emotion.

It doesn’t help that even among health care providers, these words can be quite confusing. “Trauma” is frequently used in emergency rooms to describe an occurring crisis. But “trauma” means something very different to a psychiatrist, and also to a surgeon.

Try to choose your words carefully when you use them. Asking why somebody is sad when they tell you they have depression – might make the person feel misunderstood or undermined. Try asking them to clarify, or to tell you what they are experiencing before you make as assumption.

Use words like “perfectionist” instead of “OCD” or “moody” instead of “bipolar.” The more time we put into what we say, is more time we put into understanding others.

How would you rename mental health disorders?

Chris Lee PMHNP-BC is a psychiatric nurse practitioner at DreamCloud Psychiatry in Miami Beach, Florida.

5 Reasons Why Miami Loves DreamCloud Psychiatry

Here’s why we created DreamCloud:

1. THERE AREN’T ENOUGH PSYCHIATRIC PROVIDERS IN FLORIDA.

Psychiatrists are facing the largest doctor shortage of any specialty in Florida over the next 10 years, according to a recent study conducted by the research firm IHS Global on behalf of the Teaching Hospital Council of Florida and the Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida. Statewide, Florida will need another 1,075 by 2025, the report found.

2. FINDING A PSYCHIATRIST CAN BE INTIMIDATING.

Dream Cloud is not your traditional psychiatrist. You won’t get an overwhelmed doctor who gets too many patients and not enough time to see them. We’re here to fight that stereotype and give you the experience your mental health deserves. We’re here to be your therapist, your life coach, your inspiration, your dream-team. We want coming to DreamCloud to feel like you’re visiting a new BFF.

3. WE MAKE IT SOOOOO EASY.

All you need is your mobile phone, laptop, or tablet to see your provider from home. We send all prescriptions safely, electronically to any pharmacy in Florida or New York! You can call or text us, or simply book a visit online at dreamcloud.co

4. WE’RE NOT EXPENSIVE.

Don’t spend $450 to see somebody you’ve never heard of. We offer unlimited visits! Save your money and bet on somebody you know you can trust. We have a stellar reputation in the community, voted best Psychiatrist in Miami Beach! Our memberships costs 1/3 of what the average psychiatrist charges — and we deliver better, higher quality care that you’ll want to tell all your friends about.

5. DREAMCLOUD IS WITH IT.

It’s about time for psychiatric care to catch up to speed in order to meet the needs of today’s busy, fast-paced generation. We know there’s a lot of stigma in mental health and we’re in for the fight. Are you ready? Get started here.

—-

429 Lenox Avenue, #418, Miami Beach, Florida 33139 – (877) 990-0001

dreamcloud.co

The Difference Between Psychology And Psychiatry

It’s one of the most common questions. How would you answer it in simple terms? Don’t Google it, that’s cheating!

I think I would say something like this:

Psychology is the study of thought patterns and the way we think and see things. It looks at the way we process experiences, interpret information, and the mental framework through which we perceive the world around us.

Psychiatry is the study of behavioral medicine and the physiological expression of our mental health. It evaluates healthy brain functioning by looking at patterns in our physical health and its effect on how we act, sleep, and eat.

Does that sound about right? How would you describe the difference? What would you add or remove?

Chris Lee PMHNP-BC is a psychiatric nurse practitioner at DreamCloud Psychiatry in Miami Beach.

I Survived Suicide And This Is What I Learned

Finding the right words to say is never easy. But these words changed my life.

National Suicide Prevention Day is September 10, 2018.

It’s not easy to talk about. But I can think of two times in my life when I felt that my life might end by suicide. The first time was in my early teens. The second time was in my 20s.

They were certainly times where life had become difficult, but I couldn’t point a finger at any one reason or another as to what truly was causing the feelings. When asked “why,” the only answer I could think of was to say that it simply felt more right than wrong, and that it seemed like the inevitable ending.

I also couldn’t say that it was a notably sad time. I hadn’t experienced any grief or extreme loss, I wasn’t being bullied or abused. Nobody was dying of illness. I was not in any financial crises. I had a job, and I had not been recently heartbroken.

But I felt extremely lonely. I had no hunger for life because I felt like life had no hunger for me. I did not believe in true happiness because I didn’t feel like I would ever find it, that it would be impossible to keep, and that I wasn’t good enough to deserve it.

My days were filled with silent pain. I isolated myself, just as I had done as a child when things at home weren’t going too well. The darkness consumed me day and night, lasting months each time, like a cold winter.

One wintry morning in February, I wrote a suicide letter, and knew exactly what I wanted to put in it. The first thing I remember writing was how thankful I was for the beautiful life I had been blessed with, my family, and all the wonderful things I’ve done and seen.

I wrote about certain memories that brought me joy, and all the incredible life experiences and places I had been to, that had shaped me into what I believed was a gentle, compassionate, and loving man.

But the letter ended with these words:

“I want you to know that I am so happy. But I am so so lonely.”

As gas from the oven filed the roofsiiie the room I thought about the isolation I experienced growing up with significant adversity. I had been prescribed medication at age 14, but stopped when I started college, wondering if all my problems were just “thoughts” and not any type of actual disorder, despite a family history of mental health issues. A childhood of suppressed anxieties had weakened my self-esteem and hope for the future.

I was hospitalized, held for a week, but I and I survived.

I pushed on for many years, got back on medication, confronted my demons through therapy, friendship, medication, and prayer, and as I grew into my thirties, I discovered an entirely new storyline – a bright one – waiting for me all along.

I haven’t looked back since those times, and I haven’t sat out “on the edge” in many many years. But I do know what it felt like, to be sitting there, feeling broken and empty, while others judged and could not understand. And I remember learning which things helped and which things did not:

1. Bargaining with me and trying to convince me of what I was not able to see, did not work. It only made me feel further away from being normal.

2. Instructing me or making suggestions did not work well either. The assumption that I could not make decisions for myself forced me to ask myself what terrible things I was capable of doing.

3. Crying did not help. Calling me selfish did not help — In both instances the guilt brought on greater, more intense pain. And while some people are motivated by guilt to change, I saw my problems as being burdensome and that there was nothing I could do to change that for anybody.

There was only one thing that worked. And I did not expect it. — I had not spoken to my father in over 10 years. But word traveled quickly in my family that I wasn’t doing well, and he reached out.

He shared with me the story of what he felt was the loneliest time in his life. He described what it felt like to lose his family from alcohol, watch his business fail, and then sink into long period of isolation and shame. A professional scuba diver, he admitted to removing his oxygen tank several times at the bottom of the ocean, seeing it as the easiest and most peaceful way out.

Many parts I was able to relate to. He was not upset with me, did not cry nor judge me, and did not try to suggest answers for any of my problems.

But I’ll never forget the words that changed everything:

“My son, you are never alone. I will sit here with you. And we will sit here together for as long as we have to. There’s no place else we need to be right now but here.”

It was the most neutral and loving response I never expected to hear. He wasn’t even there with me, it was a phone call. And I was in tears.

He listened to me cry for about 20 minutes and said: “Whenever you’re ready, we’re going to stand up and walk back into life and find out what happens next… together. Okay?”

It took many years, but I grew strong and gained wisdom. When others feel lonely, I can see it like a glint in their eyes. We all can. Nobody wants to feel alone.

Company does not judge, it does not teach, nor pity. It does not assume burden or guilt. Company is not friendship or romance. Company is the feeling of belonging.

When I learned that even those who don’t belong, can belong with each other, I realized that we truly are never alone.

Suicide does not always mean depression. Depressed people do not always die by suicide. But feeling apart from others is lethal.

If you or somebody you know is planning to hurt themselves or leave this life — Please stay. We need you here. We need more people like you here. We need your compassion and love. We need to hear your story and we need to learn to listen. You may not feel it right at this moment. But you belong.

There’s no place else we need to be right now but here.

Chris Lee is a psychiatric nurse practitioner and the founder of DreamCloud Psychiatry in Miami Beach, Florida.

chris@dreamcloudpsychiatry.com http://www.dreamcloudpsychiatry.com

National Suicide Helpline: Call 1-800-273-8255

DreamCloud Psychiatry Keeps It Real With Telemedicine

The following is a press release distributed via PRLog.com.

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. – Sept. 20, 2018 – PRLog — A small company called DreamCloud Psychiatry based in Miami Beach, Florida, is looking to change the way mental health providers deliver virtual medical services. Chris Lee, its founder, wanted to create a solution to what he calls “one of telemedicine’s greatest challenges,” which is “keeping it real.”

“The most important part of a patient-provider relationship in telemedicine is maintaining a connection that feels real,” says Lee. “If the patient feels disconnected in any way from their provider, they will most likely look for another one.”

Lee is an NYU-graduate psychiatric nurse practitioner and contributing writer for The Mighty, a mental health website with over 20,000 visitors daily. He created DreamCloud Psychiatry with a specific target market in mind – millennials. “Younger patients are obsessed with mental health. They are advocates for topics and current issues that are important to them. They care not only about perceptions, but also things like politics, entertainment, and social media, from a mental health standpoint.”

His practice, which opened in 2017, has “redesigned psychiatric mental healthcare,” according to its website at www.dreamcloudpsychiatry.com. By using energetic words and imagery which speaks to its demographic, Lee has built a practice with roughly 300 patients in less than a year.

According to the American Telemedicine Association, over half of all US hospitals are using telemedicine to offer affordable, accessible healthcare to Americans. But Lee says that it’s only halfway of a solution.

“We can’t keep creating telemedicine practices that feel like big-box corporate companies. Millennials like small brands. They gravitate toward things that have an identity which they can relate to,” says Lee. “Our patients connect with us through social media, they engage with our blogs, and they tell me they feel comfortable asking questions the way they might ask one of their peers. We try to focus on building familiarity with a strong presence on YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and our blog, Mentably.

Victoria Huff, of The Thirty, identifies millennials as “a generation that has come to be defined by its relationship with mental health.” And she’s right. With over 88% of 18-29 year olds using social media platforms, the American Psychiatric Association conducted a survey earlier this year and found that millennials are by far the most anxious generation yet. According to the US Census in 2015, there are over 75.4 million millennials in the US.

Looking for a great psychiatrist is becoming increasingly difficult as the number of psychiatrists practicing in the US continues to dwindle. Forbes Magazine reported in February 2018 that of the 18,000 psychiatrists currently practicing in the US, 3/5 of them are over the age of 55 and likely to retire soon in the years to come.

There is no doubt that telemedicine will continue to increase in popularity and that many gaps in healthcare delivery have the potential to become filled by virtual medicine. However, the success of telepsychiatry relies on “keeping it real.” DreamCloud Psychiatry in Miami Beach strives to do just that.

Contact
DreamCloud Psychiatry
429 Lenox Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
contact@dreamcloudpsychiatry.com
8779900001